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20121101
20121130
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of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he was 81 years old. >> he never became hollywood. larry hagman remained dallas. he was from fort worth and he always will stand for dallas. what a legend. love that guy. >> check in with rick reichmuth and see what our weekend first alert forecast looks like. >> looking good. you worry about thanksgiving weekend for travelers getting home and maybe another storm at the end of it we made through the entire thing scot-free. it's cold. 13 degrees in minneapolis. the tenks have dropped off from where you were on wednesday. aside from that, no big storms. cold front eastern seaboard. behind it a ton of sunshine. there will be a
in dallas. >> who shot j.r.? one of the greatest cliff hangers in tv history. larry hagman played j.r. ewing on the landmark primetime soap opera, dallas. >> don't come in the closer. >> he was the con knifing elder son and businessman that everyone loved to hate. >> i'm going to bring bobby down. i'm going to cut him out if i have to destroy ewing oil to do it. >> hagman is the only cast member to appear in all 35 episodes from 1978 to 1991. >> what are you doing here? >> just this year hagman reprized his signature role. >> i just came by congratulate yaw. tnt launched its own version of dallas. at one time hagman was auctioning off some memorabilia. >> you have more hats up for auction than most women have shoes. >> atthe people know you collect hats, they send you halts from all over the world. >> hagman was was a self-confessed heavy drinker and smoker. he needed a liver transplant and then worked for the great american smokeout. >> i know that -- they call me and say, hey ex-stopped smoking because i sow you. >> come on, jeanie. >> did you say something, master? >> being barbara eden's
drama "dallas." a rather nasty guy that people loved to hate. before that, he played a nice guy, captain tony nelson on "i dream of jeannie." he appeared here on "today" last june, and we'll have a look back at his life and career next. >> a legend, absolutely. >>> it is the day after black friday and people were going crazy hunting for bargains, so as you do your shopping this weekend, we'll reveal some ingenious tricks retailers use to get you to spend more and more of your hard-earned cash. >>> speaking of shopping, today is small business saturday. a day for you to support the local mom and pop shops in your town. you can do it every day, of course. something very important to new york city mayor michael bloomberg, who will join us to talk about it in our next half hour. >>> then an unusual punishment for a convicted killer in oklahoma. a teenager was sentenced to spend ten years in church after pleading guilty to manslaughter. the ruling has sparked a legal dispute and we'll hear from both sides in that case. >>> a bit later, we'll switch gears with a look at tonight's power ball ja
in raleigh and 80 currently looking for a daytime high in dallas and 70s on the gulf coast. >> brian: first story in sports is not the amazing newings. former world boxing champ hector camacho was shot in the face. he's in critical condition and shot in puerto rico. hit in the face and neck. another man in the car was killed. so far no motive was revealed. basketball now. lakers eeking out a win under the new coach mike d'antoni. they won over the nets. and we'll let you know how the new stadium s. unbelievable performance for the college hoopster last night. wake the kid and get them dress put them in the shower. jack taylor from division three granle college in iowa scored 138 points. that is a ncaa record. break them down. kilmeade, twen-27 three point and 52 of 108 shots from the field and 7-free throse and world's best basketball players took notice and listen what the pros say. charles jenkins. wouldn't be surprised if he transferred tomorrow with the points. kevin dur an. jack taylor you serve a shost jack daniels after that performance. i am not sure he was 25. i am not sure if that
motorcade drove through downtown dallas. despite the holiday, dozens of people fwagathered in jfk's hon in the spot where he was shot. a major commemoration will be held for the next year's 50th anniversary. >>> can you feel the heat? with the jackpot hovering at around $325 million, bucks, powerball fever, spreading like wildfire out there. gamblers across the country are hoping for an early christmas present. when the numbers are drawn tomorrow night. a winner opting for a lump sum cash payout can count on taking home $212 million. now, the downside, the odds of winning this thing, about one in 175 million. >> not bad. probably better than the odds of probably getting one of the tv screens in the black friday line. >> i don't usually gamble in the lotsry. when it gets big, it's hard not to buy a couple tickets. >> for the office pool. if you're one that is out of the office pool and everyone wins. >> this office one i would leave here mid sentence. you might want to consider another set of odds. can the cowboys survive against the powerhouse exploits of redskins phenom rg3. spoiler al
to be a pretty good incentive to get somebody to drive. sheppard is a nice place. dallas is into fiery there. do they still guarantee you guys a fighter at it in so? >> now, pretty much the same as anywhere else. >> that was the same in damage. when i went through, if you were to shepherd you were going to get a fighter. there was some good ones, but the most part they got a lot of fighters. it's probably better that way and more fair all around. what else? underwent okmulgee guys up. okay, well thanks for coming very much. i appreciate it. if you guys buy the book, even better. harpercollins actually send me up to read a couple more. one is nonfiction. it's the history of fighter pilot, not just americans, but all of them. i've been burning how much i didn't know about my own profession. it's going to be a very interesting book. it's due sometime next year, so i'll take another six months after that, so maybe 2014. and then there's a fictional book i wrote called the mercenary that will be out in e-book form to start with i think in january or february. unlike most good fiction, it's not really
visiting a mansion that was the set for dallas where he played j.r., who used to say darlin', dying at aim -- age of 81. . >> in terms of prices when they could go back down is when? >>guest: there is another interesting issue, a lot of our corn is used to make ethanol which is an alternate fuel which has been subsidized. so, we are seeing a lost corn is being siphoned away from food, to earth not, which is expensive. >>heather: the changes in oil prices? >>guest: yes, oil prices have we are seeing energy prices going down. what can we expect in the near and long term? >>guest: you will seafood prices go up. >>heather: how high? >>guest: hard to say. but another issue, farmers are seeing a real estate bubble, you would never expect that, we just had one burst, but a lot will depend on what happens to land prices and right now they are at all time highs in the midwest which is helping farmers. on the other hand, farmers looking forward and this will impacted if prices, they are going to face estate tax which hurt as lot of them because small farmers pass on the small businesses, so if they
-mail or allowing people to vote in districts where they do not live, provisional bots. -- dallas. -- provisional ballots. i do not know that it is more democrats than republicans. i suppose, it could drive down the popular vote for obama nationally, but i don't know that it will necessarily do that in any of the states that were hit. host: kristie from tennessee. caller: we all know as americans, whether we are democratic or republican to run a health care reform is very important. i am a political science major at my state college. i know a little bit about the dynamics of how politics works on an elementary level. you say in your article that obama and the next four years would be willing to cut deals with republicans, possibly. why if he was elected in 2008, why didn't you listen to the voices in congress on the republican side, and why did he pushed through a health care reform act that all of us as americans feel so strongly about? it would have been so nice if he had chosen by partition chip -- bipartisanship then and we would not be in a stalemate. of americans, a lot do like obamacare. i
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
there was a large conspiracy usually involving figures within the u.s. government what happened in dallas, the a a assassination of john f ken i kennedy. >>> says the u.s. will not follow off the so-called fiscal cliff. allen was at the club of washington to talk about the economy and job creation. this is forty minutes. >>> so we're pleased today to have the chairman of the president counsel of economic adviser with us. alan krueger. the native of new jersey. he went to undergrad at cornell. he was not only the top of the class, but a high jumper on the track team. then went harvard to get the ph.d. in economics, and his thesis adviser was larry summers. he has an academic career and is now a has been a name professor at princeton teaching economics, it's now second tour of duty in the obama administration beginning in the obama administration he served as assistant secretary of economic affairs in treasury, and then went back to princeton and was lured back by the president to become the chairman of the counsel of economic advisers. a position he consumed a year ago confirmed in novembe
in dallas? 30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> truman got into politics after having failed that many businesses as a young man. the only way to get into politics in the missouri was to be part of a machine. he looked up with the pending breast machine, which was the most corrupt and often -- tender grass machine which was the most corrupt and often vicious. the second is what we all know about, how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what is the story behind the atomic bomb before he became president, and then when the decision was on his desk? it is still a controversial story, i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency, aida donald looks up the life of harry truman sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c-span's "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy h
tab. on october 7, sergeant first class riley g. steaches was laid to rest at the dallas-forth worth national cemetery, not far from his hometown. while earlier that day his life was celebrated and his service to our country was celebrated in a church full of friends and family and fellow patriots. our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of mr. stevens. he will forever be remembered as an outstanding soldier, husband, father and friend. we thank them for his service to our country. john 15-13 which says greater love hath no man than this than the man who laid down his life for his friends. as i close, mr. speaker, i'd like to ask all americans to continue praying for our country during these difficult times, for our military men and women and for our first responders who keep us safe by their sacrifice each day. god bless our military, -- military men and women and god bless america. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. hirono, for five minutes. ms. hirono: mr. speaker, i rise today to introduce a resolution com
that lee harvey oswald was going to shoot at kennedy that morning in dallas. >> brian latell, the book "castro's secrets mpt the cia and cuban's intelligence machine." we ran out of time, and he can't tell you the poisen pen story. pick it up and read it yourself. it's unfortunate because it's a good story so, brian, thank you for joining us on booktv here in miami. >> thank you so much. >> well, the next panel is starting here. we'll take you to the room now. this is some war memoirs and books. jake tapper of abc news wrote a book called "the outpost: untold story of americanñ va" beeping min bush" dust to dust accounts, and also "the story of war" and the life that follows, setting up the room now. you can see, and they are just getting ready to introduce the three speakers. i want to remind you that the previous panel, one of the speakers there was david, "barack obama: the story," go to facebook.com/booktv, and david will be answering and commenting on your questions and comments. go ahead, you can post those now, and he will be responding, oh, in about 15-20 minutes or
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14